Category Archives: Cancer Caregivers

“Feed” Your Battle Against Breast Cancer with These Food Tips

Diet Tips for Breast Cancer Patients
Diet Tips for Breast Cancer Patients

Is there an ideal diet to aid in breast cancer treatment? While there is no ‘best diet’ for those undergoing treatment, to reduce the risks of treatment and support your body, nutritional science conducted by the University of Hawaii Cancer Center points to ways that modifying diet may help.

Taking a ‘Bite’ Out of Risks

In terms of breast cancer treatment and prevention, research shows this hormonally-driven disease is strongly affected by obesity. However treatment time is NOT the time for weight loss. Instead, a shift to the development of healthful habits, including a balanced diet that promotes overall health, is ideal.

Foods that Feed the Battle

A diet of fresh veggies, plant-based proteins, and high-fiber foods – foods packed with phytochemicals, antioxidants, flavonoids, isoflavones, and other super-food, cancer-fighting properties – is ideal. Limiting alcohol intake is also advisable, as excessive intake is linked to cancer risk.

What’s on the Menu?

– Cruciferous veggies like broccoli, Brussel sprouts, and cauliflower.
– Plant-based proteins, including soy, beans, nuts and seeds.
– Other lean proteins that help boost immunity and retain muscle mass, such as poultry, fish, and eggs.
– High-fiber fruits, veggies, and grains like rice and quinoa that keep appetite (and cholesterol) in check.

Planning for Success

Planning shopping and meals on ‘good days’ can help make dietary changes and adequate nutrition easier. Form a monthly/weekly meal plan, ‘batch cooking’ large hearty stews or casseroles that can be easily packed into smaller portions for easy reheating when you’re under-the-weather. Aim for 5-6 smaller meals/day.

Looking for the ‘magic pill’ for breast cancer treatment? Ensure a better outcome with the help of Issels® today.

Dealing with Family Members Who Don’t Agree to Your Treatment Choices

Dealing with Family Members Who Don't Agree to Your Treatment Choices
Dealing with Family Members Who Don’t Agree to Your Treatment Choices

Whether you opt for cancer immunotherapy or more traditional treatment methods, some family members may disagree with your choices. With open and honest communication, you can all work together to make sure you get the support you need.

Tips for Discussing Cancer Treatment

When a family member objects to your chosen form of cancer treatment, it’s usually caused by concern for you and fear of the unknown. Experts suggest the following tips for maintaining productive and positive discussions.

– As the patient, you are the one who will be directly affected, so your wishes should be considered first. You should also feel free to change your mind if circumstances change or you get new information.

Talk about your priorities in choosing a particular course of treatment. Knowing what’s important to you will help others understand your decision.

– People may be uncomfortable talking about cancer and treatment options for a wide variety of reasons, including fear, lack of knowledge and religious beliefs. Ask a member of your healthcare team or an experienced counselor to be involved in the discussions.

– Identify problems that may arise during treatment so everyone is prepared.

– Find out from your doctor which decisions are urgent and which ones are less pressing. This helps reduce the amount of pressure that family members may feel.

Cancer Immunotherapy with a Personal Touch

Dealing with cancer is frightening for patients and their families. At Issels®, we refuse to let the disease rob you of your individuality. Our treatments are tailored to address your personal situation and needs.

Contact us to learn more about our non-toxic cancer immunotherapy programs.

Cancer Caregiver Tips: Talking About Cancer with Your Loved One

Cancer Caregiver Tips: Talking About Cancer with Your Loved One
Cancer Caregiver Tips: Talking About Cancer with Your Loved One

Are you a cancer caregiver who’s tiptoeing around your loved one because you’re afraid of saying the wrong thing? Use these tips to guide your conversations in positive and helpful directions.

Tips for Talking to a Cancer Patient

  • Don’t stress about coming up with the perfect words. This is a new situation for both of you. If you don’t know what to say, be honest about it. Your loved one will let you know what he or she needs.
  • Keep the focus on the patient. You’re there to help them, not the other way around. Talk to another friend or family member if you need a sounding board.
  • Avoid clichés or dismissive comments like “You’ll be fine” or “At least you got the ‘good’ cancer.” Of course you don’t want to be a source of doom and gloom, but minimizing the situation doesn’t make the patient feel any better.
  • Every case of cancer is different. Don’t bring up friends, family members or acquaintances and compare their situations.
  • Don’t ask for details about their cancer treatment such as blood test results or possible side effects. Let them share information if they like, but respect their personal boundaries.
  • Sometimes no words are necessary. Your loved one might want you to provide a sympathetic ear, or may prefer a period of silence. Be willing to graciously accommodate their wishes.

Personalized Cancer Treatment from Issels®

Your experience with cancer is unique, so your treatment should be also. Visit our website to learn more about cancer vaccines and other individually tailored and integrative immunotherapy for cancer treatments.

Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role

Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role
Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role

Cancer brings major changes to the life of a patient, but becoming a caregiver can be equally challenging. Here’s some information to help you prepare for your tough but rewarding new role.

Tips for Becoming a Cancer Caregiver

1. Ask for Help

No matter how invested you are in the job, you won’t be able to do it all. Don’t feel guilty about enlisting help as needed.

2. Be Prepared to Hear “No”

Not everyone will be willing to assist, even those who make a vague offer to help. Instead of passing judgment and letting resentment build up, either talk to the person about what’s bothering them or simply let it go.

3. Take Care of Your Own Health

You won’t be much help if you’re feeling tired and run-down. Make time to relax and enjoy some of your favorite activities.

4. Maintain Your Regular Routine

Follow your own daily routine as much as possible. You’ll have to make some concessions of your time, but stress can build up if the disconnect from your normal life is too great.

5. Create a Support Network

Despite your good intentions, caring for a cancer patient is bound to cause occasional thoughts of frustration, anger and fear. Talk about your feelings with a family member or close friend. You might also consider seeing a therapist or joining a support group.

Personally Tailored Immunotherapy for Cancer at Issels®

No two cancer patients have the same needs from caregivers or treatment, so our integrative immunotherapy for cancer programs are created for each individual’s case. Visit our website for more information.

Help Survivors and Patients by Giving the Gift of Your Time – Ways to Volunteer Locally

Enrich Your Life By Helping Others.
Enrich Your Life By Helping Others.

If you’re like most people, cancer is a cause that’s near and dear to your heart. Almost everyone knows someone who has battled this dreadful disease, or is currently receiving cancer treatment. Maybe in your life, that someone is yourself.

Here at Issels®, we know the importance of volunteers in this field. This is why we want to offer you some incredible volunteer opportunities as a way to give back.

Volunteer Your Time for a Great Cause

There are many ways you can give your time to support cancer research and improved cancer treatments. Some of these include:

  • Road to Recovery – There is always a need for people to drive patients to and from their cancer treatments.
  • Making Strides Against Breast Cancer – This is a community event that raises money for breast cancer research.
  • The Relay for Life – This is another community event that you can participate in to raise funds for cancer research.
  • Look Good, Feel Better – This is a wonderful opportunity that allows you to personally touch the lives of cancer patients. You’ll help them learn various beauty tricks and improve the way they feel.

Ways You Can Make a Difference for Those Receiving Cancer Treatment

Maybe you’re not quite sure where you fit in. There is a need for all kinds of help. What are your strengths? Maybe you enjoy:

  • Administrative or clerical work
  • Promoting events online or through social media
  • Organizing recreational activities
  • Helping to raise money

Whatever you enjoy, there is a place for you.

If you would like to learn more about immunotherapy and its place in cancer treatment, please contact us.

Find Out What to Expect When You Become a Cancer Caregiver

Improving the Lives of Others Can Help Improve Your Own Life.
Improving the Lives of Others Can Help Improve Your Own Life.

Has a loved one recently been diagnosed with cancer? Assuming the responsibilities of becoming a caregiver can seem overwhelming. Here are some cancer caregiver tips that will help you to better perform your role while maintaining your own physical and mental well-being.

Caring for a Cancer Patient

• The caregiver role is fluid. Duties can change based on factors such as where a patient is in the treatment process and whether he or she is staying in a hospital or at home.

• Caregivers are vital members of a patient’s healthcare team. Meet with the doctors frequently and don’t be afraid to speak up if you have questions or need more clarification.

• Talk to your loved one about how much they want to share with friends and family members and keep others updated accordingly.

• Everyone has their own way of coping with illness. Be available, but respect the patient’s wishes if he or she wants to be alone or doesn’t want to talk.

Caring for the Caregiver

Caregiver is a rewarding role, but the road can be bumpy. Don’t feel guilty if you experience sadness, fatigue or grief. Joining a support group, either in person or online, can be a great source of strength.

• Have some friends or family members who can assist or even take over temporarily if you need a break.

• Plan activities such as workouts or movie outings that will help you maintain balance.

Issels® Is a Resource for Patients and Caregivers

Visit our website for more cancer caregiver tips as well as information about our personally created immunotherapy treatment programs, including cancer vaccines and NK cells.