Category Archives: Cancer Survivors

What is Recurrent Cancer – What Do I Need to Know?

What Do I Need to Know?
What Do I Need to Know?

Have you ever heard stories about patients undergoing immunotherapy for cancer and experiencing no recurrence? Here’s what you need to know about recurrent cancer and what it means in terms of your overall health.

When Cancer Comes Back

Recurrence refers to cancer that returns after treatment has been completed. It originates with cancer cells that remained after the first course of treatment but were too small to show up in post-treatment testing.

Recurrent cancer is the same form as the original tumor, as opposed to a new type of cancer that may develop in patients who have a history of tumors. The latter is known as second primary cancer.

Types of Recurrent Cancer

Cancer recurs in three different ways:

• Local recurrence is in the same general area as the original tumor.

• Regional recurrence describes cancer that has grown into lymph nodes or other tissues near the original cancer.

• Distant recurrence is when cancer has spread to organs or other tissues far from the original site.

Another term that describes distant recurrence is metastatic cancer. Regardless of where the cancer has spread, it’s still the same type as the original tumor.

Testing and Treatment

Your doctor will likely repeat many of the same tests that resulted in the first diagnosis. These tests provide information to help determine the appropriate course of treatment.

Effective Non-Toxic Immunotherapy for Cancer at Issels®

The personally tailored immunotherapy for cancer treatments at Issels® are designed to boost your own immune system’s ability to recognize and destroy cancer cells. Contact us today to learn how our programs have helped patients achieve long-term remission.

Coaches vs. Cancer Has Raised $100 Million for Cancer Research

Coaches and Teams Have Raised Millions for Research
Coaches and Teams Have Raised Millions for Research

Actors, athletes and other high-profile people often use their celebrity to help promote awareness of cancer research. One such program is Coaches vs. Cancer, which has raised more than $100 million to support the American Cancer Society (ACS).

Leading the Charge Against Cancer

As with most Americans, basketball coaches across the country have been affected by cancer, either personally or through a loved one. The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) has partnered with the ACS to form Coaches vs. Cancer, a program designed to empower the coaches to participate in the fight against cancer.

Coaches vs. Cancer: The “Battles”

Thanks to their personal and professional experiences and positions of leadership, basketball coaches are in a great position to raise awareness of cancer research among their teams and communities. Some of their creative initiatives have included:

  • In February 2017, their 3-Point Challenge let fans pledge an amount for every successful three-point shot made by their favorite team that month.
  • During Suits and Sneakers Week, coaches across the country wear sneakers on game day to symbolize the role of nutrition and physical activity in reducing cancer risk.
  • Hardwood Heroes is part of March Madness, the NCAA’s popular basketball championship tournament. 2017 marked the second year of this event in which a basketball team made up of cancer survivors took on a team of survivors from last year’s game.

Issels®: The Leader in Immunotherapy for Cancer Treatment

For decades, Issels® has raised the bar on cancer treatment with our non-toxic and integrative immunotherapy programs. Visit our website to read and hear testimonials from patients who have achieved long-term remission.

Tips for Coping with Body Changes While in Cancer Treatment

Coping with Body Changes While in Cancer Treatment
Coping with Body Changes While in Cancer Treatment

While cancer’s most serious impact is on your health, it can also affect the way you look and feel about yourself. Here are some tips on maintaining a positive self-image while undergoing immunotherapy for cancer or other treatment.

Internal and External Changes Caused by Cancer

Everyone’s cancer is different, and so are the side effects you experience. Common body changes, short-term or long-term, include:

Loss of hair

• Scars or other changes in skin

• Fluctuations in weight

• Loss of body parts (limbs, breasts, appendages)

• Loss of fertility

How to Cope with Body Changes

• Grieving is an essential step in dealing with any type of loss. Feeling sad or angry is human, not weak. Give yourself time.

• Coping with cancer can actually have a positive influence on mental and emotional characteristics such as strength and wisdom. Focus on and appreciate the aspects that have improved.

• Be good to yourself. Buy new clothes, experiment with a new hair style or color, try out some different makeup. Continue to take pride in your external appearance and eventually your internal mindset will catch up.

• Stay busy with physical activities, hobbies or volunteering.

• Body changes can cause physical and emotional roadblocks regarding sex and intimacy. Don’t be embarrassed to talk to your doctor for help. These problems can often be resolved.

At Issels®, Each Patient Is Special

We understand that your situation isn’t like that of anyone else. Our immunotherapy for cancer treatments are individually tailored to address your unique needs. Contact us today to learn why Issels® is a leader in state-of-the-art immunotherapy for cancer programs.

Taking Care of Yourself: Important Safety Reminders About Your Cancer-Compromised Immune System

Keep in Mind Your Immune System

When you’re undergoing cancer treatment, it demands the full attention of your immune system, leaving the door open for bacteria and other germs to sneak in. Use these food-handling tips to reduce the risk of disease and infection.

Food Preparation

  • Wash hands thoroughly with warm, soapy water before and after food prep and before eating.
  • Keep foods at the proper temperature. Hot foods should be above 140° F, while cold foods should be below 40° F.
  • Don’t thaw proteins at room temperature. Use a microwave or place them in the refrigerator with a pan to catch drips.
  • Defrosted foods should be used right away and never refrozen.
  • Don’t take chances. If any foods look, feel or smell strange, dispose of them immediately.
  • Wash produce under running water using a vegetable scrubber. Don’t use soaps, bleaches or other chemical cleaning products.

Cooking

  • Always use a clean spoon when tasting foods while cooking.
  • Don’t guess when cooking meat. Use a food thermometer for accuracy. Beef should be cooked to 160° F while poultry should be cooked to 180° F.
  • If your microwave doesn’t have a turntable, rotate the dish a quarter-turn a couple of times during cooking to ensure that food is evenly heated.
  • When reheating leftovers, cover food with a lid or plastic wrap and stir frequently.

Immunotherapy at Issels®: Personalized Non-Toxic Cancer Treatment

Our immunotherapy treatment programs are designed to boost your immune system, allowing it to fight cancer naturally. Visit our website to learn more about how our state-of-the-art cancer treatment has helped many patients achieve long-term remission.

What Does Cancer Remission Mean?

What Does Cancer Remission Mean?
What Does Cancer Remission Mean?

This past April actress Shannon Doherty, who was diagnosed with breast cancer nearly two years ago, announced via social media that she is in remission. But is that the same thing as “cured?” An expert from the American Cancer Society (ACS) takes a look at the meaning of the term.

Does “In Remission” Mean “Cured?”

Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of ACS, recently spoke to Fox News Health about understanding the true concept of “remission.” Officially, when doctors examine a patient after cancer treatment and find no sign of the disease, he or she is declared to be in remission.

While remission is a major victory for cancer patients, it doesn’t necessarily mean the end of the story. Their doctors continue to conduct regular exams watching for a relapse, which occurs when cancer returns.

Remaining Vigilant After Cancer Treatment

Initially, post-treatment exams are performed every few months, and become less frequent while the patient remains cancer-free. Even so, cancer can sometimes reappear after years of remission. Doctors suspect that such cases arise due to cancer still being present, but too small to be detected.

Chances of a relapse are often affected by the type of cancer and the stage it was in at the time of diagnosis. Cancer patients can also enter partial remission when the size of the tumor decreases by at least 50 percent.

Immunotherapy Cancer Treatment at Issels®

Our personally tailored immunotherapy programs have helped numerous patients diagnosed with all forms of cancer achieve long-term remission. Contact us for more information about our special testing methods and integrative treatment protocols.

New to Cancer Caregiving? Not Sure What to Do?

New to Cancer Caregiving?
New to Cancer Caregiving?

If you’re not careful, becoming a cancer caregiver can become one of the most stressful experiences of your life. However, it doesn’t always have to turn out that way. What might have been a frustrating time can become one of the most rewarding times you have ever experienced. Here at Issels®, we want nothing more than to equip you for what lies ahead. To do that, we want to provide you with some essential cancer caregiver tips.

What to Expect as a Caregiver for Someone with Cancer

If you’re caring for someone with cancer, it’s important to know what you can expect. Many people find it to be a pleasant experience. Spouses, siblings and other close relatives often find themselves as caregivers for family members with cancer. However, others may fill this role too. For example, neighbors and even co-workers can also be cancer caregivers.

On the other hand, you may feel as though this role is being forced upon you. It might not be something you’re willing to take on, so it’s important for you to be clear about your boundaries from the very beginning.

The Best Cancer Caregiver Tips

As a caregiver, you need to set healthy boundaries and take care of yourself too. These cancer caregiver tips will help you to do that. You should always:

• Look for signs of depression within yourself

• Find your own support system

• Get plenty of exercise

• Eat a health diet

• Consider getting personal counseling

• Take some time for yourself

At Issels®, we take care of our patients’ caregivers too. If you need more information about our immunotherapy services, please contact us.