Tag Archives: Breast Cancer

Surgery for Breast Cancer May Awaken Sleeping Cancer Cells

Surgery for Breast Cancer May Awaken Sleeping Cancer Cells
Surgery for Breast Cancer May Awaken Sleeping Cancer Cells

One of the challenges in developing immunotherapy for cancer treatments is that benefits of a method are sometimes offset by drawbacks. In a recent example, scientists have found that breast cancer surgery may trigger micrometastases that are too small to be found on imaging.

Seeking Treatment for Metastatic Breast Cancer

Approximately 35 percent of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer already have thousands of these micrometastases lying dormant in their system. Only half of them develop into full-blown metastatic cancer, and scientists believe the half that remain dormant are controlled by immune system activity.

A research team at the Whitehead Institute wanted to explore the problem, but they didn’t want to withhold surgery from breast cancer patients to form a control group. Testing was conducted on mice that had been injected with breast cancer cells and undergone simulated “surgery.”

“Surgery-Driven Interruption of Dormancy”

Of the mice that had “surgery,” 60 percent had continued growth of cancer cells, while only 10 percent of the mice that didn’t receive surgery had the same result. The team concluded that “surgical wounding” superseded attacks by the immune system, allowing the tiny malignancies to grow.

The test also uncovered a possible solution. When the mice were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) pre- and post-“surgery,” it appeared to counteract the negative effects of the wounds. This opens the door to the possibility of over-the-counter products such as aspirin and ibuprofen being used as treatments.

Immunotherapy for Cancer: Personalized, Non-Toxic Treatments

At Issels®, our individually developed cancer programs focus on destroying tumors while treating internal factors that contribute to cancer growth. Contact us to learn more.

New Three-Part Molecule May Decrease Growth of Certain Types of Cancer Tumors

Three-Part Molecule May Decrease Growth of Certain Types of Cancer Tumors
Three-Part Molecule May Decrease Growth of Certain Types of Cancer Tumors

If one is good and two is better, is three the answer? Scientists are hoping that a new three-part molecule could be an answer regarding effective immuno oncology for breast cancer patients.

Stemming the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells

Approximately 20 to 30 percent of breast cancer cases involve over-expression of HER2, which is a growth factor that leads to aggressive multiplication of cancer cells. This acceleration often makes these types of cancer resistant to therapy, resulting in poor prognoses.

Dr. Hongyan Liu, a bioengineer at the Georgia Cancer Center, led a team that developed a chimera, or three-part molecule, to suppress the growth factors. The chimera targets HER2, HER3 and EGFR because one member of the HER “family” can compensate when another one is blocked.

Exploring the Abilities of the Three-Part Molecule

The new molecule is non-toxic, easy to manufacture and relatively cost-effective, making scientists optimistic about its value for immuno oncology. Dr. Liu and her team are currently conducting studies to determine if the chimera can treat cancer that is resistant to Herceptin, a drug that inhibits HER2.

Breast cancer is not the only form that grows due to over-expression of HER receptors. Dr. Liu is hopeful that the chimera will have future applications for lung, head and neck cancers as well.

Issels®: The Leader in Personalized Immuno Oncology Treatments

Our non-toxic immuno oncology programs have been successful in treating therapy-resistant cases of breast cancer and other forms. Contact us today to learn more about how we are carrying on the legacy of our founder, Dr. Josef M. Issels, who predicted the future of immunotherapy.

New Cancer Treatments May Be Studied After Gene Breakthrough Research for Breast Cancer

New Cancer Treatments May Be Studied After Gene Breakthrough Research for Breast Cancer
New Cancer Treatments May Be Studied After Gene Breakthrough Research for Breast Cancer

In the most comprehensive breast cancer treatment study of its kind to-date, scientists may have uncovered the potential for new breast cancer treatment therapies, and possibilities for the development of new drugs aimed at preventing the disease.

More than 100 Genes Linked to Breast Cancer Revealed
After discovering a bounty of genes linked to breast cancer, scientists may soon be able to develop new genetic tests for predicting breast cancer risk, and using the data obtained, ensure targeted cancer treatment for patients.

Genes Linked to Survival Could Aid in Prevention
Thirty-two additional genes, linked to survival in those with receptor-positive breast cancer, were also uncovered. These are hoped to be used to test new treatments, as well as for providing targeted prevention protocols for those most at-risk of developing breast cancer.

Super Sleuths
In the study, funded by Breast Cancer Now, scientists from the Institute of Cancer Research in London used a new genetic technique called ‘Capture Hi-C’ to analyze how genes interacted with 33 DNA regions known to play a role in breast cancer. Of the 110 genes identified in the study, the majority had not been previously linked to breast cancer, providing fresh new insight for those striving to develop improved cancer treatment regimens.

A Vital Piece to Puzzling Out the Disease
The findings are seen as integral to unraveling how genetic changes in the building blocks of the body’s DNA influence breast cancer risk, providing a key piece to solving the cancer puzzle.

Puzzling out your cancer treatment options? Discover the path to improved health with Issels® individualized cancer treatment protocols today.

New Imaging System Identifies If a Breast Cancer Will Respond Favorably to Chemotherapy

New Imaging System Identifies If a Breast Cancer Will Respond Favorably to Chemotherapy
New Imaging System Identifies If a Breast Cancer Will Respond Favorably to Chemotherapy

When it comes to fighting tumors, effective cancer treatment is only part of the equation. Researchers are also seeking ways to determine which patients will be more receptive to a particular course of treatment. A recent study offers encouraging results for a method of predicting breast cancer response to chemotherapy.

Predicting Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Patients

Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer that is invasive but operable frequently undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy beginning five to six months before surgery. Chances of recurrence are reduced in patients whose cancer cells are completely eliminated by the chemotherapy.

According to Dr. Dawn Hershman, co-leader of the study conducted at Columbia University in NYC, determining which patients are likely to achieve a favorable response makes a significant difference in cancer treatment. If their chances of positive response are low, adjustments can be made for a more effective treatment.

Reading the Clues in 3D Imaging

Based on the idea that chemotherapy affects a tumor’s vascular network, the research team set out to determine if imaging could be used to detect these changes. Blood absorbs light, so the scientists used a system incorporating red and near-infrared lighting.

Armed with 3D images of both breasts, researchers studied the ways in which blood interacted with the tumors. In a group of 34 patients, blood outflow accurately identified 92.3 percent of responders, while increase in blood concentration identified non-responders in 90.5 percent.

Advanced Stage Cancer Treatment at Issels®

Patients with advanced and therapy-resistant tumors have turned to Issels® for non-toxic, personalized treatment programs. Visit our website to read and hear testimonials from our patients who have achieved long-term remission.

MSK1 Protein Research May Answer Why Some Breast Cancer Stays Dormant

MSK1 Protein Research May Answer Why Some Breast Cancer Stays Dormant
MSK1 Protein Research May Answer Why Some Breast Cancer Stays Dormant

Scientists have long been puzzled by the process of metastasis in breast cancer and what causes the cells to lie dormant. A recent study revealed valuable information that can pay off with more effective breast cancer treatment.

Understanding Latency in Breast Cancer Metastases

Researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) in Barcelona set out to study estrogen-positive (ER+) breast tumors that feature long periods of asymptomatic latency. This type accounts for 80 percent of breast cancer cases.

The Barcelona team identified a protein kinase called MSK1 as the primary regulator of dormant metastases. After examining clinical samples from patients, the researchers determined that ER+ breast cancer tumors that don’t express MSK1 tend to suffer earlier relapse, while those that do express MSK1 experience later metastases.

Breakthrough in Breast Cancer Treatment

Head researcher Roger Gormis explained that little was previously known about why breast cancer metastasis time varies from one patient to another. Study results also showed that suppressing MSK1 causes faster-growing cancer cells that have a greater chance of metastasizing.

Benefits of the study are two-fold:

– Doctors may be better able to identify patients who are more likely to relapse and adjust treatment protocol.

– Scientists may be able to develop a treatment that mimics the role of MSK1, thereby keeping metastasis dormant for as long as possible.

Effective Late-Stage Cancer Treatment at Issels®

Our non-toxic, personally tailored immunotherapy programs have effectively treated patients with late-stage and therapy resistant cancer of all forms, including breast, lung and colorectal. Contact us to learn more about why Issels® is the leader in state-of-the-art immunotherapy treatments.

Why Many Breast Cancer Patients Stop Treatment or Only Take Partial Treatment

Why Many Breast Cancer Patients Stop Treatment or Only Take Partial Treatment
Why Many Breast Cancer Patients Stop Treatment or Only Take Partial Treatment

Many women do not trust the health care system and will often forgo radiation and drug therapy after breast cancer surgery. That is according to a survey of 2,700 breast cancer patients by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Lead author of the survey, Lorraine Dean, said over 30 percent skip treatments that are intended to kill any cancer cells that remain after surgery.

Contact Issels® for information on how combining conventional treatments with immunotherapy cancer treatment reduces the likelihood of relapse.

Doctor-patient trust is crucial

Cancer is a devastating disease and it is understandable that patients experience feelings of helplessness. It’s not just women with breast cancer who are losing trust in doctors and the health care system, it’s the general public as well. People often feel that doctors put their own financial interest ahead of patient care. When patients feel their doctors don’t listen to them or take their concerns seriously, trust begins to erode.

For the best possible outcome, it is necessary that doctors and patients have a strong bond of trust. Patients should feel comfortable being fully honest with health care providers and the doctors should always remember that a patient’s trust in them is a vital and necessary component of proper medical care. Each person’s cancer is unique and treatment should be based on the specific needs of each patient.

Personalized cancer treatment

At Issels®, we have been practicing individualized treatment for more than 60 years. We want you to make informed decisions about your cancer treatment options. Contact us today for more information on our autologous (from the patient’s own blood) non-toxic cancer treatment protocols.