Tag Archives: Cancer Caregiver Tips

Cancer Caregiver Tips: Talking About Cancer with Your Loved One

Cancer Caregiver Tips: Talking About Cancer with Your Loved One
Cancer Caregiver Tips: Talking About Cancer with Your Loved One

Are you a cancer caregiver who’s tiptoeing around your loved one because you’re afraid of saying the wrong thing? Use these tips to guide your conversations in positive and helpful directions.

Tips for Talking to a Cancer Patient

  • Don’t stress about coming up with the perfect words. This is a new situation for both of you. If you don’t know what to say, be honest about it. Your loved one will let you know what he or she needs.
  • Keep the focus on the patient. You’re there to help them, not the other way around. Talk to another friend or family member if you need a sounding board.
  • Avoid clichés or dismissive comments like “You’ll be fine” or “At least you got the ‘good’ cancer.” Of course you don’t want to be a source of doom and gloom, but minimizing the situation doesn’t make the patient feel any better.
  • Every case of cancer is different. Don’t bring up friends, family members or acquaintances and compare their situations.
  • Don’t ask for details about their cancer treatment such as blood test results or possible side effects. Let them share information if they like, but respect their personal boundaries.
  • Sometimes no words are necessary. Your loved one might want you to provide a sympathetic ear, or may prefer a period of silence. Be willing to graciously accommodate their wishes.

Personalized Cancer Treatment from Issels®

Your experience with cancer is unique, so your treatment should be also. Visit our website to learn more about cancer vaccines and other individually tailored and integrative immunotherapy for cancer treatments.

Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role

Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role
Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role

Cancer brings major changes to the life of a patient, but becoming a caregiver can be equally challenging. Here’s some information to help you prepare for your tough but rewarding new role.

Tips for Becoming a Cancer Caregiver

1. Ask for Help

No matter how invested you are in the job, you won’t be able to do it all. Don’t feel guilty about enlisting help as needed.

2. Be Prepared to Hear “No”

Not everyone will be willing to assist, even those who make a vague offer to help. Instead of passing judgment and letting resentment build up, either talk to the person about what’s bothering them or simply let it go.

3. Take Care of Your Own Health

You won’t be much help if you’re feeling tired and run-down. Make time to relax and enjoy some of your favorite activities.

4. Maintain Your Regular Routine

Follow your own daily routine as much as possible. You’ll have to make some concessions of your time, but stress can build up if the disconnect from your normal life is too great.

5. Create a Support Network

Despite your good intentions, caring for a cancer patient is bound to cause occasional thoughts of frustration, anger and fear. Talk about your feelings with a family member or close friend. You might also consider seeing a therapist or joining a support group.

Personally Tailored Immunotherapy for Cancer at Issels®

No two cancer patients have the same needs from caregivers or treatment, so our integrative immunotherapy for cancer programs are created for each individual’s case. Visit our website for more information.

New to Cancer Caregiving? Not Sure What to Do?

New to Cancer Caregiving?
New to Cancer Caregiving?

If you’re not careful, becoming a cancer caregiver can become one of the most stressful experiences of your life. However, it doesn’t always have to turn out that way. What might have been a frustrating time can become one of the most rewarding times you have ever experienced. Here at Issels®, we want nothing more than to equip you for what lies ahead. To do that, we want to provide you with some essential cancer caregiver tips.

What to Expect as a Caregiver for Someone with Cancer

If you’re caring for someone with cancer, it’s important to know what you can expect. Many people find it to be a pleasant experience. Spouses, siblings and other close relatives often find themselves as caregivers for family members with cancer. However, others may fill this role too. For example, neighbors and even co-workers can also be cancer caregivers.

On the other hand, you may feel as though this role is being forced upon you. It might not be something you’re willing to take on, so it’s important for you to be clear about your boundaries from the very beginning.

The Best Cancer Caregiver Tips

As a caregiver, you need to set healthy boundaries and take care of yourself too. These cancer caregiver tips will help you to do that. You should always:

• Look for signs of depression within yourself

• Find your own support system

• Get plenty of exercise

• Eat a health diet

• Consider getting personal counseling

• Take some time for yourself

At Issels®, we take care of our patients’ caregivers too. If you need more information about our immunotherapy services, please contact us.

Tips for Caregiving at the Hospital for Cancer Patients and Caregivers

Tips For Caregivers
Tips For Caregivers

Whether patients undergo traditional or alternative cancer treatments, there may come a time when further care requires a stay in the hospital. Even though the patients are surrounded by doctors, nurses and other healthcare providers, they benefit from continued support from their personal caregivers.

If you are a caregiver for a hospitalized cancer patient, you may feel discouraged or overwhelmed by the turn of events. Here are some tips to help you maintain mental and emotional balance while handling the needs of both you and the patient.

  • Actively participate in the patient’s health care team. As a close friend or family member, you can provide valuable information to assist the medical professionals in deciding on the proper care.
  • Establish a relationship with the patient’s nurses. They are on the front lines of patient care, and they can help you understand treatments and procedures while offering support and information.
  • Consult with a hospital social worker or case manager. They can help you stay on top of administrative details such as insurance matters, coordination of care between specialists and support resources.
  • Develop an organized information management system. The patient relies on you to handle tasks like filling prescriptions, scheduling appointments and contacting family and friends. Develop a simple method to keep documents and other necessary information organized and easily accessible.

Alternative cancer treatments at Issels® are available on either an outpatient or inpatient basis. If you or a loved one is dealing with cancer, contact us today for more information about our personalized protocols such as vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer treatment.

Tips for Young Adults on Caring for a Parent with Cancer

Group of college students leaning on banister
Young Adults Can Help Parents When They Have Cancer.

Young adulthood is an exciting time of establishing independence, starting a career and finding romance. Becoming a caregiver for a parent with cancer is a major responsibility that may curtail some of these activities, but it can also strengthen your familial bond.

Here are some tips for finding balance between your caregiver role and your personal life.

  • Set aside time when you can sit down and talk to your parent without being rushed or interrupted. Discuss their medical wishes, including possible alternative cancer treatments. Establish plans for financial management, care visits and any other pertinent issues.
  • After the discussion, use the information to create a master task list. Enlist the support of siblings, family members and close friends to help out where needed.
  • Schedule a meeting with your parent’s health care team to get the facts about your parent’s illness. He or she should be present as well to approve release of protected medical information.
  • Make sure your contact information is kept in your parent’s file. You should also keep a list of doctors, pharmacists and anyone else involved in your parent’s treatment.
  • Don’t feel obligated to give up your personal life. Spending time with friends and participating in your favorite activities reduces your stress level, allowing you to be a better caregiver.
  • Join a support group to get encouragement and advice from others who are or have been in your shoes.

The non-toxic alternative cancer treatments at Issels® focus on harnessing the body’s natural immune response to fight cancer. If you, your parent or another loved one has been diagnosed with cancer, contact us for more information.

Tips on How to be the Best Cancer Caregiver You Can Be

Tips For Cancer Caregivers
Tips For Cancer Caregivers

At Issels® Immuno-Oncology Centers, providing immunotherapy to cancer patients is what we do every day. For caregivers of a partner diagnosed with cancer, it can sometimes become overwhelming knowing what to say, what to do, and when to do it. Understanding the role can help you be the best caregiver possible.

Role of a Caregiver

A caregiver should consider himself or herself as part of a team comprised of the patient, medical personnel, friends and family. As a caregiver, you’ll have many responsibilities from taking over the chores and duties of your partner to dispensing drugs.

You’ll have the responsibilities of:

  • paperwork
  • paying bills
  • scheduling
  • appointments
  • transportation
  • proper diet and sleep

Maintaining good verbal and listening techniques with your partner is vital as you are the person providing support and helping your partner make decisions. You must have good, open communication with other team members to keep everyone up-to-date.

Taking Care of the Caregiver

One of the most important things to remember is you must take care of yourself. A caregiver works long hours that can result in not eating, resting, sleeping or exercising properly. If you aren’t in top-notch form, you won’t be able to provide the best care for your partner.

Talk to your own physician prior to taking on the role of caregiver to find out about counseling services or support groups. If you have a job, talk to your human resource representative about amending your work schedule, taking a leave of absence, and if any assistance programs are available provided by the company.

If you have questions or need more information, contact our staff at Issels® for immediate assistance with cancer care.