Tag Archives: Cancer Caregiver

Dealing with Family Members Who Don’t Agree to Your Treatment Choices

Dealing with Family Members Who Don't Agree to Your Treatment Choices
Dealing with Family Members Who Don’t Agree to Your Treatment Choices

Whether you opt for cancer immunotherapy or more traditional treatment methods, some family members may disagree with your choices. With open and honest communication, you can all work together to make sure you get the support you need.

Tips for Discussing Cancer Treatment

When a family member objects to your chosen form of cancer treatment, it’s usually caused by concern for you and fear of the unknown. Experts suggest the following tips for maintaining productive and positive discussions.

– As the patient, you are the one who will be directly affected, so your wishes should be considered first. You should also feel free to change your mind if circumstances change or you get new information.

Talk about your priorities in choosing a particular course of treatment. Knowing what’s important to you will help others understand your decision.

– People may be uncomfortable talking about cancer and treatment options for a wide variety of reasons, including fear, lack of knowledge and religious beliefs. Ask a member of your healthcare team or an experienced counselor to be involved in the discussions.

– Identify problems that may arise during treatment so everyone is prepared.

– Find out from your doctor which decisions are urgent and which ones are less pressing. This helps reduce the amount of pressure that family members may feel.

Cancer Immunotherapy with a Personal Touch

Dealing with cancer is frightening for patients and their families. At Issels®, we refuse to let the disease rob you of your individuality. Our treatments are tailored to address your personal situation and needs.

Contact us to learn more about our non-toxic cancer immunotherapy programs.

Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role

Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role
Cancer Caregivers: What to Expect When You Step Into the Role

Cancer brings major changes to the life of a patient, but becoming a caregiver can be equally challenging. Here’s some information to help you prepare for your tough but rewarding new role.

Tips for Becoming a Cancer Caregiver

1. Ask for Help

No matter how invested you are in the job, you won’t be able to do it all. Don’t feel guilty about enlisting help as needed.

2. Be Prepared to Hear “No”

Not everyone will be willing to assist, even those who make a vague offer to help. Instead of passing judgment and letting resentment build up, either talk to the person about what’s bothering them or simply let it go.

3. Take Care of Your Own Health

You won’t be much help if you’re feeling tired and run-down. Make time to relax and enjoy some of your favorite activities.

4. Maintain Your Regular Routine

Follow your own daily routine as much as possible. You’ll have to make some concessions of your time, but stress can build up if the disconnect from your normal life is too great.

5. Create a Support Network

Despite your good intentions, caring for a cancer patient is bound to cause occasional thoughts of frustration, anger and fear. Talk about your feelings with a family member or close friend. You might also consider seeing a therapist or joining a support group.

Personally Tailored Immunotherapy for Cancer at Issels®

No two cancer patients have the same needs from caregivers or treatment, so our integrative immunotherapy for cancer programs are created for each individual’s case. Visit our website for more information.

Help Survivors and Patients by Giving the Gift of Your Time – Ways to Volunteer Locally

Enrich Your Life By Helping Others.
Enrich Your Life By Helping Others.

If you’re like most people, cancer is a cause that’s near and dear to your heart. Almost everyone knows someone who has battled this dreadful disease, or is currently receiving cancer treatment. Maybe in your life, that someone is yourself.

Here at Issels®, we know the importance of volunteers in this field. This is why we want to offer you some incredible volunteer opportunities as a way to give back.

Volunteer Your Time for a Great Cause

There are many ways you can give your time to support cancer research and improved cancer treatments. Some of these include:

  • Road to Recovery – There is always a need for people to drive patients to and from their cancer treatments.
  • Making Strides Against Breast Cancer – This is a community event that raises money for breast cancer research.
  • The Relay for Life – This is another community event that you can participate in to raise funds for cancer research.
  • Look Good, Feel Better – This is a wonderful opportunity that allows you to personally touch the lives of cancer patients. You’ll help them learn various beauty tricks and improve the way they feel.

Ways You Can Make a Difference for Those Receiving Cancer Treatment

Maybe you’re not quite sure where you fit in. There is a need for all kinds of help. What are your strengths? Maybe you enjoy:

  • Administrative or clerical work
  • Promoting events online or through social media
  • Organizing recreational activities
  • Helping to raise money

Whatever you enjoy, there is a place for you.

If you would like to learn more about immunotherapy and its place in cancer treatment, please contact us.

Tips for Long Distance Cancer Caregiving

Long Distance Caregiving
Long Distance Caregiving

If a loved one receives a diagnosis of cancer, you want to be at their side offering care and assistance. Unfortunately, in many cases the realities of life may prevent that. You can still be a source of support when you follow these long-distance cancer caregiver tips.

Providing Effective Long-Distance Cancer Care

  • Contact the hospital discharge planner to coordinate the patient’s return to home.
  • Arrange for a home health aide to assist the patient until permanent plans are settled. An aide is also a good option to fill in the gaps or provide other caregivers with a break.
  • Create a network of friends and family members who can help, and set up a phone tree for quick and efficient communication.
  • Keep a bag at the ready packed with toiletries and clothes so you’re ready to travel at short notice.
  • Consider the distance to be traveled and whether ground or air is your better option.
  • If you have children or pets, have a contingency plan in place regarding their care in your absence.
  • Talk to your boss and co-workers about your situation. You may be able to continue your work offsite, but review your workload and deadlines in case someone else needs to step in for you.

What is the Issels® Difference?

At Issels®, our immunotherapy for cancer treatments are personally designed to meet each patient’s individual needs. Visit our blog for more cancer caregiver tips and information about our cutting-edge non-toxic therapies, including cancer vaccines and LAK cells.

Tips for Treating Hot Flashes and Night Sweats While in Cancer Treatment

melatonin-cancer
Treating Hot Flashes And Night Sweats

Do you sometimes wake up in the middle of the night to warm skin and damp sheets? Night sweats and hot flashes are a common occurrence with cancer patients. It can result from your course of treatment or from the tumor itself. Women tend to be more susceptible, but men can also experience either condition.

Sweat is your body’s natural way of regulating temperature. When the moisture evaporates on your skin it creates a cooling effect. Patients being treated for breast cancer or prostate cancer often have hot flashes because treatment can trigger menopause or menopause-like symptoms.

Help is available to control hot flashes and night sweats, allowing you to rest more comfortably. Discuss these options with your physician to determine which one is most appropriate for you.

  • In some cases hot flashes may be treated with hormone replacement therapy. Some patients have had success with certain antidepressants or anticonvulsants.
  • Stress and anxiety are contributing factors, so learning coping skills to deal with these emotions can help moderate night sweats and hot flashes. Meditation is a powerful method, and hypnosis is a newer treatment that has shown positive results.
  • Wear loose-fitting clothes made from natural fibers and keep your home well-ventilated.
  • Manufacturers of herbs and supplements such as Vitamin E and flaxseed make extravagant claims, but studies show that the results are mixed at best. Do not attempt this treatment without consulting your healthcare provider.

At Issels® we utilize a course of immunotherapy that strengthens your own immune system and reduces side effects. Visit our website to see and hear success stories from our patients.

Meaningful Ways to Help a Friend or Family Member with Cancer

Helping Family with cancer.
Helping Family with cancer.

When a family member or friend is diagnosed with cancer, people are often torn about how to respond. They want to help but are sensitive about intruding. Not knowing whether an offer of help will be appreciated or viewed as meddling often leads friends to make vague offers to help.

Unsure what kind of help is being offered, cancer patients and their families are frequently uncomfortable taking their friends up on such offers. As we noted in our previous post, making your offer to help specific can breach any feelings of discomfort.

Here are additional suggestions on ways to offer meaningful aid to a friend or family member who is battling cancer:

  • Follow through. Many offers of help follow the initial diagnosis of cancer; but for the cancer patient and his family the battle keeps going after those first few weeks. Don’t stop helping after a week or two. Friends who are still helping a month, 3 months, 6 months after the diagnosis make a real difference in the family’s life.
  • Don’t overstep. Helping does not give you license to manage your friend’s life or offer unsolicited advice. Be sensitive to the need for autonomy, especially if cancer strips away personal independence. Respect your friend’s boundaries.
  • Remember celebrations. Life does not stop because you have cancer. Remember holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, holiday traditions, etc. Celebrate life!
  • Be supportive. Check your own feelings, opinions and prejudices at the door. Respect your friend’s cancer treatment decisions. Maintain a warm, supportive, encouraging and positive attitude when you are with your friend and his or her family.